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Free Food for Millionaires by Min Jin Lee
Literary fiction

Free Food for Millionaires

Debut

We love supporting debut authors. Congrats, Min Jin Lee, on your first book!

by Min Jin Lee

Quick take

The culture, class, and family clashes within the life of an impossibly ambitious woman.

Good to know

  • Illustrated icon, Icon_400

    400+ pages

  • Illustrated icon, Icon_SocialIssues

    Social issues

  • Illustrated icon, Icon_Literary

    Literary

  • Illustrated icon, Icon_Acclaim

    Critically acclaimed

Synopsis

Casey Han's four years at Princeton gave her many things, "But no job and a number of bad habits." Casey's parents, who live in Queens, are Korean immigrants working in a dry cleaner, desperately trying to hold on to their culture and their identity. Their daughter, on the other hand, has entered into rarified American society via scholarships. But after graduation, Casey sees the reality of having expensive habits without the means to sustain them. As she navigates Manhattan, we see her life and the lives around her, culminating in a portrait of New York City and its world of haves and have-nots.

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Member ratings (1,241)

  • Kelly C.

    Buffalo, NY

    An excellent read raising questions of wealth and womanhood, what it means to struggle to succeed. I appreciated the extensive list of characters and Lee's ability to move seamlessly between stories.

  • Grace L.

    Bremerton, WA

    It was a slow read, but I enjoyed the characters. There was too much detail in some parts and not enough in others. The ending was ambiguous. But there is something about it that will stay with me.

  • Corrie M.

    Manassas, VA

    Long read, but an interesting & engaging one on the Korean-American experience from a variety of angles and characters. Appreciated her treatment of characters & the complicated way they developed.

  • Lenna M.

    Kansas city, MO

    Min Jin Lee beautifully captured different backgrounds of Korean culture and intertwined them in a way that was hard to put the book down. Young, middle aged or old you related to every character

  • Sammi W.

    Indianapolis, IN

    I loved this so much. It was realistic, empathetic, vulnerable, and enticing. It's thickness was daunting but I flew through it. This is something that will stay with me. I'll miss Casey Han!